Transforming Sustainably and Regeneratively

Texas Trees Foundation seeks to conserve, connect, restore, and enhance the urban ecosystem along the SWMD Streetscape Project so that people thrive in a healthier and more responsible environment where they work, live, and visit.  The 2016 Southwestern Medical District Urban Streetscape Master Plan outlined a framework for healthy systems, healthy people, and healthy environmentContinue reading Transforming Sustainably and Regeneratively

Sustainability and Heath Care

Over the past few years, the medical community has rallied together to acknowledge that it has a vital role to play in addressing climate change. This effort grew out of the recognition that the health care  system is itself a major driver of environmental pollutants that adversely affect human health.1  There is growing consensus thatContinue reading “Sustainability and Heath Care”

A History Book Synopsis for the Hospitals of the Southwestern Medical District

“It takes a great deal of history to produce a little literature.” –             Henry James Thanks to their tireless efforts, and passion for our city’s history, Evelyn Montgomery, Ph.D. Director and Curator for the Old Red Museum of Dallas County History and Culture, along with Robert Prejean, Southwestern Medical District Manager and Urban Planner haveContinue reading “A History Book Synopsis for the Hospitals of the Southwestern Medical District”

Pegasus Park Pilot Study

Urban Heat Sensor Assessment and Evaluation  July – August 2022 Compiled by: Rose Jones, Ph.D. Research & Strategy in Urban Green Health Texas Trees Foundation August 16, 2022 “We must listen to science – and act.” ~ Presidential Executive Order1 Overview   On Thursday, July 21, Texas Trees Foundation (TTF) placed 8 mean radiant temperatureContinue reading Pegasus Park Pilot Study

It’s Bad Ya’ll: The Lethal Connection between Extreme Heat and Air Quality

In April the American Lung Association issued the 2022 “State of the Air” report, an assessment that uses report card style grades (A, B, C, D, and F) to track and report Americans’ exposure to air pollution. On this report card, the DFW metroplex earned an “F” for ozone pollution. It was also ranked asContinue reading “It’s Bad Ya’ll: The Lethal Connection between Extreme Heat and Air Quality”

Pegasus Park Pilot Study is Underway 

It’s official! We are collecting urban heat data and are now poised to capture some of the hottest temperatures on record.  As we continue to work with our partners to finalize logistics for installing and deploying climatic sensors throughout the Southwestern Medical District (SWMD), the Foundation took full advantage of the extreme heat wave thatContinue reading “Pegasus Park Pilot Study is Underway “

June 2022 Newsletter

As we place sensors throughout the District to capture thermal comfort data, and soon begin Phase 2 of Equitable Engagement to gain feedback from District users on streetscape and park amenities, its important to revisit our roots. Explore how and why we use biophilia to inform the design process. Also, learn about the SWMD team’sContinue reading “June 2022 Newsletter”

Youth and Mental Health: The Covid Generation

Although it appeared that youth were spared the ravages of COVID-19, a full picture of their experience is only now emerging. Data released by the CDC a few weeks ago show that during the pandemic, a third (37%) of high school students reported experiencing poor mental health with 44% saying that they felt persistently sadContinue reading “Youth and Mental Health: The Covid Generation”

Health Care Workers’ Burnout: Could Nature be the antidote?   

It’s become a well-known phenomenon, healthcare workers (HCWs), burned out, exhausted, worn out mentally, emotionally, and physically, from the Covid-19 pandemic are leaving health care in droves. They have faced life-threatening situations, pathogen exposure, and shift overload, all with limited to nonexistent resources and support. This has taken a toll. The rate of depressive disordersContinue reading “Health Care Workers’ Burnout: Could Nature be the antidote?   “

Trees Changing the Front Lines of Urbanism 

It is troubling, or should we say “treeoubling,” that the accepted norm in our cities are single rows of trees lined up like soldiers along a street. Project after project we tell the street tree to embrace the astonishingly small hole and to grow and flourish in the poorest of soil surrounded by hardscape surface.Continue reading “Trees Changing the Front Lines of Urbanism “